JAPAN PICS
Oda City, Shimane
cs
Table of Contents

  Iwami-ginzan Park (ΌR)
  Promenade (V)
  Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft (ԕ)
  Sahimeyama-jinjya Shrine (R_)
  Reigi-zan Saihon-ji Temple (TR{)
  Gin-no-Sato Watanabe-ke (̗ nӉ)
  Totsutotsu-an (X)
  The Mining Town Remain (ݒn)
  500 Stone Statues of Disciples of Buddha (ܕS )
JAPAN PICS GENERAL INDEX
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Do-o (Hokkaido Central)
  
   Naganuma Town (The Tsuchinotomi Society Tour)
2006
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2006
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2006
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2006
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2006
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2004-2010
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2005
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2005
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2009-2011
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2004-2012
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2007
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2008-2011
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2007
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2003
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2006
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2006
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2005
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2005
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2007
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2006
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2008
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2007
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2005-2007
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2002-2007
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2007
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2002-2012
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2007
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2008
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2009
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2009
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2009-2011
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2009
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2009-2011
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2009
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2008
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2008
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2007
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2007
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2009-2010
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2008
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2008
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2008-2012
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2012
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2010
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2005-2012
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2005-2012
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2005-2011
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2006-2012
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2005-2012
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2010
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2010
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2012
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2006
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2006
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2011
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2009
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2006
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2005
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2006-2010
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2005-2010
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2011
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2011-2012
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2010
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2005-2012
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2007-2011
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2010
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2008-2010
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2008
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2011
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2008-2011
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2006-2009
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2009
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2011
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2002-2012
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2002-2012
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2002
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2008
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2008
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2011
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2012
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2012
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2012
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2012
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2010-2012
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2010-2012
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2011
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2011
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2011
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2011
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2010
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2010
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2010-2012
Kagoshima
  
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2010
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2010
Nagasaki
  
   Nagasaki City
2010
Oita
  
   Oita City
2010

Oda City, Shimane
2012


  Oda City (cs) is a city located on the coast of the Sea of Japan in Shimane Prefecture, Japan.  As of July 1, 2012, the city has an estimated population of 37,061, with a population density of 85 persons per sq km.  The total area is 436.12 square kilometres (168.37 sq mi).  The city was founded on January 1, 1954.  Oda is home to the Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine (ΌR), a UNESCO World Heritage Site.  
  Located in the central coastal portion of Shimane Prefecture, Oda borders the Sea of Japan to the north and the Chugoku Mountains (Rn) to the south.  Mount Sanbe (OrR; 1,126 metres [3,694 ft]), part of Daisen-Oki National Park (RB򍑗), is a double volcano of the Hakusan Volcanic Zone (RΎR/RΎR), and is situated to the southeast of the city.  
  The area of present-day Oda is located in Izumo Province (o_n).  The area was a strategic meeting point of three ancient transportation routes: the San'in (RA), Izumo (o_), and the Bingo ().  As a result, numerous market towns were developed in the area.  On October 1, 2005 the towns of Nima (m) and Yunotsu (Ò), both from County Nima (玖S), were merged into Oda, and County Nima was dissolved as a result of this merger.  

  

Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site (UNESCO World Heritage, listed in 2007)
  The Iwami Ginzan (ΌR; Silver Mine of Iwami) was a silver mine in the city of Oda, Shimane Prefecture, on the main island of Honshu, Japan.  It was the largest silver mine in Japanese history. It was active for almost four hundred years, since its discovery in 1526 until its eventual closing in 1923.  It was added to the World Heritage List in 2007.  
  It was developed in 1526 (i6N) by Kamiya Jutei (_J), a Japanese merchant.  It reached its peak production in the early 17th century of approximately 38 tons of silver a year which was then one third of the world's production.  Silver from the mine was used widely for coins.  It was contested fiercely by warlords until the Tokugawa Shogunate won control of it in 1600 as a result of the Battle of Sekigahara (փ̐킢) in 1600.  It was later secured by fences and barricaded by pine trees. Yamabuki Castle was built in the centre of the complex.  Silver production from the mine fell in the nineteenth century as it had trouble competing with mines elsewhere.  Then in exchange for silver some kinds of mineral like copper had been mainly mined in the mountain.  The mine was eventually closed in 1923.  
  Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine played a pivotal role in East Asian trade, where silver was the key currency.  In Europe and China, the mine had been known as the largest silver mine that could compare with the Cerro Rico in Potosi (now the World Heritage Site in Bolivia).  In foreign countries, because the silver mined at Iwami Ginzan was very high quality, it came to be known as one of the Japanese brand of silver called "Soma Silver" (\[}).  The name derived from the village of Sama (; Soma) in which the mine was.  This silver was given the highest trading credit in East Asia.  From 17th century, the silver coin made of the silver of the mine had been traded as not only one of the basic currencies in Japan but also as the currency in the trade with China, Portugal and the Netherlands.  (Portugal had traded with Japan from late 16th century.  Netherlands had traded with Japan from 17th century.)    The prosperity of the mine can be known that it was indicated in the maps at the time as the "Silver Mine Kingdom."  With the progress of navigation, the monarchs of Western Europe had gotten a lot of maps imported from the Muslim world and had made their own maps.  The fleet with the maps came to India, China and Japan to trade goods and get the silver mined.  The feudal lords who governed the mine traded with these countries actively.  
  Parts of the mining town remain in good condition and the Japanese Government has designated it as a Special Preservation District for Groups of Historic Buildings (dv`IQۑn: zR) in 1987 (a62N).  The government also applied for it to become a World Heritage Site.  The bid succeeded in July 2007, although an evaluation of the site by the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOSMOS) produced no findings of "outstanding universal value."  Usually the development of silver mine needed large quantities of lumber.  But in Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine it was developed with fewer ecological pollution because of the proper control of the forest.  It was one of the reasons that Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine was selected in the World Heritage Site.  It's also selected in 100 greatest geological sites of Japan in 2007.  (Cited from the site of "Wikipedia")

IMAGE
IMAGE NO.
DATA
Iwami-ginzan Park
     Iwami-ginzan Park (ΌR) is the first place you should visit for sightseeing.
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(Friday 31 August) Iwami-ginzan Park, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Iwami-ginzan Park, Oda City: An illustrated map of Iwami-ginzan.
  
     
Promenade
     Promenade (V) from Iwami-ginzan Park to Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft (ԕ).
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(Friday 31 August) Promenade (V) from Iwami-ginzan Park to Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft (ԕ).
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(Friday 31 August) Promenade (V) from Iwami-ginzan Park to Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft (ԕ).
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(Friday 31 August) Promenade (V) from Iwami-ginzan Park to Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft (ԕ).
  
     
Takahashi House
     Takahashi House (ƏZ) on the Promenade (V) near Fukujinyama-mabu Mineshaft (_Rԕ).  The chief of Takahashi family was a leadman of the mine from generation to generation.  This is the only existing house of a leadman.
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(Friday 31 August) Takahashi House () on the Promenade (V) near Fukujinyama-mabu Mineshaft (_Rԕ).
  
     
Ryugenji-mabu
     Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft (ԕ) is the only gateway tourists can walk through.  There are seven mineshafts of Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site registered on the list of the World Heritage Site: Ryugenji-mabu (ԕ), Kamaya-mabu (ԕ), Shinkiri-mabu (V؊ԕ), Okubo-mabu (vۊԕ), Fukujinyama-mabu (_Rԕ). Hon-mabu ({ԕ) and Shinyokoai-mabu (Vԕ).
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(Friday 31 August) Entrance to Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft of the Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Entrance to Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft of the Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft of the Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft of the Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft of the Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft of the Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft of the Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft of the Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft of the Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City: Illustrations of mining.
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(Friday 31 August) Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft of the Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City: Illustrations of mining.
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(Friday 31 August) Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft of the Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City: Illustrations of mining.
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(Friday 31 August) Exit of Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft of the Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
  
     
Sahimeyama-jinjya Shrine
     Sahimeyama-jinjya Shrine (R_) near the exit of Ryugenji-mabu Mineshaft.  It enshrines Kanayamahiko-no-kami (RF) who is the God of Mines.  It was founded in 1434 (i6N) by 12th lord of Suo Mochiyo Ouchi (, 1394-1441) at the command of 6th Muromachi Shogun Yoshinori Ashikaga (`, 1394-1441; r.1428-1441).  The present shrine building was reconstructed in 1819 (2N) after the great fire in the previous year.
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(Friday 31 August) Sahimeyama-jinjya Shrine, Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Sahimeyama-jinjya Shrine, Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Sahimeyama-jinjya Shrine, Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
  
     
Reigi-zan Saihon-ji Temple
     Reigi-zan Saihon-ji Temple (TR{) is located at Ho 209 Omori-cho, Oda City (csXz209).  It was founded in 1631 (i8N) as a temple of the Tendai-shu (V@) sect of Buddhism: now it is a temple of the Jodo-shinshu (y^@) sect.  The gate was originally built for Yamabuki-jo Castle (R).
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(Friday 31 August) Reigi-zan Saihon-ji Temple, Ho 209 Omori-cho, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Reigi-zan Saihon-ji Temple, Ho 209 Omori-cho, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Reigi-zan Saihon-ji Temple, Ho 209 Omori-cho, Oda City
  
     
Gin-no-Sato Watanabe-ke
     Gin-no-Sato Watanabe-ke (̗ nӉ) or the Watanabe House (nӉƏZ) was originally owned by the Watanabe family, officers of the mine.  It was built in 1811 (8N) and after restoration now opens to the public from April 2010.  The address is Ni 4-3 Omoricho Oda City (csXjS-R).
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(Friday 31 August) Gin-no-Sato Watanabe-ke, Ni 4-3 Omoricho Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Gin-no-Sato Watanabe-ke, Ni 4-3 Omoricho Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Gin-no-Sato Watanabe-ke, Ni 4-3 Omoricho Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Gin-no-Sato Watanabe-ke, Ni 4-3 Omoricho Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Gin-no-Sato Watanabe-ke, Ni 4-3 Omoricho Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Gin-no-Sato Watanabe-ke, Ni 4-3 Omoricho Oda City
  
     
Totsutotsu-an
     Gin-no-Sato Watanabe-ke (̗ nӉ)/Totsutotsu-an (X) is a Japanese restaurant where you can enjoy traditional local food with bits of modern tastes.  The restaurant is just behind the historical Watanabe house.
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(Friday 31 August) Totsutotsu-an, Ni 4-3 Omoricho Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) My lunch at Totsutotsu-an, Ni 4-3 Omoricho Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) My lunch at Totsutotsu-an, Ni 4-3 Omoricho Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) My lunch at Totsutotsu-an, Ni 4-3 Omoricho Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) My lunch at Totsutotsu-an, Ni 4-3 Omoricho Oda City
  
     
The Mining Town Remain
     Machinami-chiku (ݒn), or the Mining Town Remain, was designated it as a Special Preservation District for Groups of Historic Buildings (dv`IQۑn: zR) in 1987 (a62N).
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(Friday 31 August) The Mining Town Remain, Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) The Mining Town Remain, Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) The Mining Town Remain, Iwami-ginzan Silver Mine Site, Oda City
  
     
500 Stone Statues of Disciples of Buddha [Gohyaku-Rakan]
     Gohyaku-Rakan Rakan-ji Temple (ܕS ) is part of Kongo-san Anraku-ji Temple (R y).  It is located at I-804 Omori-cho, Oda City (csXC804).  There are 500 Buddhist stone statues are seated in two caves, about 250 in each.
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(Friday 31 August) Gohyaku-Rakan Rakan-ji Temple, I-804 Omori-cho, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Gohyaku-Rakan Rakan-ji Temple, I-804 Omori-cho, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Gohyaku-Rakan Rakan-ji Temple, I-804 Omori-cho, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Gohyaku-Rakan Rakan-ji Temple, I-804 Omori-cho, Oda City: The Stone Statue of Sarasvati (the goddess of fortune).
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(Friday 31 August) Gohyaku-Rakan Rakan-ji Temple, I-804 Omori-cho, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Gohyaku-Rakan Rakan-ji Temple, I-804 Omori-cho, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Gohyaku-Rakan Rakan-ji Temple, I-804 Omori-cho, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Gohyaku-Rakan Rakan-ji Temple, I-804 Omori-cho, Oda City: No photo-taking inside.
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(Friday 31 August) Gohyaku-Rakan Rakan-ji Temple, I-804 Omori-cho, Oda City: No photo-taking inside.
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(Friday 31 August) Gohyaku-Rakan Rakan-ji Temple, I-804 Omori-cho, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Gohyaku-Rakan Rakan-ji Temple, I-804 Omori-cho, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Gohyaku-Rakan Rakan-ji Temple, I-804 Omori-cho, Oda City
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(Friday 31 August) Gohyaku-Rakan Rakan-ji Temple, I-804 Omori-cho, Oda City



        


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