JAPAN PICS
Ninohe City, Iwate
茧ˎs
Table of Contents

  The Mabuchi River (n)
  Kunohe-jo Castle Remains (ˏ)
  Fukuan-kosha Shrine/Temple (u),
    known as Naritasan Gokoku-den Shrine (c썑a)
  Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple (tR V䎛)
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Ninohe City, Iwate
3 October 2007

  Ninohe City (ˎs) is located along the Mabuchi River (n) in the northern inland part of Iwate Prefecture bordering on Aomori Prefecture.  The first reference to Ninohe can date back to 1191 (2nd year of Kenkyu; v2N) after Mitsuyuki Nambu (암s) was enfeoffed as Lord of County Nukanobu (S).  The main castle of the Nambu clan (암) stood in this area until Shigenao Nambu (암 d) moved to Morioka in 1633 (10th year of Kan-ei; i10N).  The city is in the bosom of the beauties of nature; Oritsume Basen-kyo (ܒܔn勬; Oritsume-Basen Glen), Inaba-kogen (t; the Inaba Heights), Kindaichi-onsen (cꉷ; Kindaichi Spa Resort).  Also, it has Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple (tR V䎛) founded by the high priest Gyoki (s, 668-749) in AD 728, and the remains of Kinohe-jo Castle (ˏ), the last battlefield for Hideyoshi Toyotomi (Lb Gg) to bring the whole country under his rule.
  Its main industries were planting tobacco and miscellaneous cereals and making lacquer ware (japan) widely known as "Joboji Shitsu-gei" (@|).  With those traditional industries, this area has developed as a post town (h꒬) or a way stop along the two highways, the Oshu-kaido (BX) and the Kazuno-kaido (pX) until the Edo Period, and lately along the National Road No.4 and the Prefectural Road No.6.  Now the city has an interchange of Hachinohe Express Way (ˎԓ) and a station of the Tohoku Shinkan-sen Line (kV; Tohoku Super Express).
  After merging with the adjacent Joboji Town (@) on January 1, 2006, the current Ninohe City has an area of 420.31 square kilometers including 277.10 sq km of forests and mountains and only 9.14 sq km of residential areas.  The population is 31,477 (2005 census).

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Mabuchi River
     The Mabuchi River (n), viewed from Ishikiridokoro (ΐ؏), Nonohe City.
  The origin Mabuchi River is in Tsukushimori (ˎX, 998 m high) in Kuzumaki Town () in the northern Kitakami Mountains (kRn).  It runs through Ninohe City, Ichinohe Town (˒) till Hachinohe Port (ˍ`) along the Pacific Ocean where Hachinohe City (ˎs) which is situated at the mouth of the river.  The river is 106 km long and its catchment area is 2670 sq km.
  In ancient times, the Mabuchi River played a very important role of the transportation in the this area called County Nukanobu (S) in the Nambu clan's reign in the Kamakura Period (q).  After the Oshu-Fujiwara family's decline in 1189, the new settlers named this area with the numbers 1-9 and the letter "he" (uˁv, meaning "a gate," "a fort" or "a village") to reclaim and make stock farms neatly in the huge wasteland area of those days.  The Nambu clan especially encouraged early settlers to produce good steeds.  Probably the river name Mabuchi (n; lit. a pool for horses) tells the deep relationship between the area and horses.  The river runs through Ninohe City (ˎs), Ichinohe Town (˒), County Sannohe (OˌS), Shinohe (l; the meeting point of the Kumahara River [F] and the Mabuchi River), Gonohe Town (܌˒), Rokunohe Town (Z˒) and Hachinohe City (ˎs).
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(Wednesday 3 October) The Mabuchi River, viewed from Ishikiridokoro (ΐ؏), Ninohe City
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(Wednesday 3 October) The Mabuchi River, viewed from Ishikiridokoro, Ninohe City
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(Wednesday 3 October) The Mabuchi River, viewed from Ishikiridokoro, Ninohe City
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(Wednesday 3 October) The Mabuchi River, viewed from Ishikiridokoro, Ninohe City
  
     
Kunohe-jo Remains
     Kunohe-jo Castle Remains (ˏ), Shiro-no-uchi, Fukuoka, Ninohe City (ˎsm).
  This castle (originally occupied about 34 ha; 21 ha now preserved) was founded by Mitsumasa Kunohe ( ), a powerful member of the Nambu clan, during the Meio Era (N; 1492-1501).  It stood on the hill which was surrounded by the three rivers, the Shratori River (), the Mabuchi River (n) and the Nekobuchi River (L).  Since then the Kunohe family aggrandized its power over the Nambu dominions.  The fourth castellan Masazane Kunohe ( , 1536-1591) was known as a lionhearted lord whose power surpassed the head family of the Nambu clan.
  In 1590 (18th year of Tensho; V18N) Hideyoshi Toyotomi (Lb Gg), who destroyed the Hojo-clan (k) in Odawara (c), embarked on repression of the Oshu District (Tohoku District) called "Oshu-shioki" (Bdu).  Nobunao Nambu (암 M), the great lord of the Nambu clan participated in the Odawara War (cU) on Toyotomi's side and successfully received Toyotomi's assurance of his dominions.  In March 1591 Masazane, with his brother Sanechika Kunohe ( e, 1542-1591) and their comrades, rose in revolt against the Sannohe-jo Castle (Oˏ), the residence of the head family while Nobunao was gone.  Nobunao recognized that his army could not defeat Masazane's revolt.  So he made an application to Hideyoshi to send reinforcements to crush down the revolt.  Hideyoshi sent his nephew Hidetsugu Toyotomi (Lb G) as the commander-in-chief with the armies of Ujisato Gamo ( ), Nagamasa Asano ( ), Mitsunari Ishida (Γc O), etc.  On September 1st, 1591 (19th year of Tensho) the allied army of over 60,000 soldiers of Nobunao and Hideyoshi encircled Kunohe-jo Castle.  However, Masazane and his comrades could hold the strongly-fortified fort surrounded by cliffs and mountain streams for four days.
  Nagamasa Asano, an excellent commander of Hideyoshi's army, worked out a stratagem: On September 4th, they asked the head priest of Choko-ji Temple (), the family temple of the Kunohe family to persuade Masazane to evacuate the fortress, saying "If they deliver up Kinohe-jo Castle, all of their lives will be secured."  Masazane was deceived.  When the castle gate was open, thousands of the allied army avalanched and murdered all the 5,000 people of the castle including women and children.  Masazane and his people's lives were given to the Toyotomi's accession to power all over Japan.
  Kunohe-jo Castle was renovated by Ujisato Gamo and renamed as Fukuoka-jo Castle () which was later awarded to Nobunao Nambu.  The head family of the Nambu clan lived here until 1633 (10th year of Kan-ei; i10N) when Shigenao Nambu (암 d), a grand son of Nobunao moved to Morioka, because this place was located in the northern part of their new dominions.  After that the castle was demolished.  (Main reference: The Kunohe-jo page of the official website of Ninohe City [in Japanese])
  
  For further interest, please read Katsuhiko Takahashi ( F)'s novel based on the historical event, Ten wo Tsuku (wVՂx; Stab the Sky, 2001).*  *Currently no English translation is available.
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(Wednesday 3 October) Signpost of Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) A diorama map of Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) A diorama map of Kunohe-jo Remains with the cliff of Kunohe-jo in the background
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(Wednesday 3 October) The diorama of Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) The diorama of Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Hon-maru Ko-guchi" ({یՌ; the Main Gateway to the Donjon), Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) The bridge between the Karamete-mon Gate (; the Rear Gate to the Castle) and the Homnaru Ote-mon Gate ({ےǎ; the Front Gate to the Donjon), Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Hon-maru no Ishi-gaki" ({ۂ̐Ί_; the Stone Fence of the Donjon), Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Hon-maru no Ishi-gaki" ({ۂ̐Ί_; the Stone Fence of the Donjon), Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Hon-maru no Ishi-gaki" ({ۂ̐Ί_; the Stone Fence of the Donjon), Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) Signpost of the Hon-maru Ote-mon Gate ({ےǎ; the Front Gate of the Donjon), Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Hon-maru" (the Donjon) of Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Hon-maru" (the Donjon) of Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Hon-maru" (the Donjon) of Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Hon-maru no Ishi-gaki" ({ۂ̐Ί_; the Stone Fence of the Donjon), Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Hon-maru no Ishi-gaki" ({ۂ̐Ί_; the Stone Fence of the Donjon), Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) Signpost of the Hon-maru ({; the Donjon), Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) Hon-maru ({; the Donjon), Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) Signpost of the Hon-maru Ko-guchi ({یՌ; the Main Gateway to the Donjon), Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) Hon-maru Ko-guchi ({یՌ; the Main Gateway to the Donjon) site with the Stone Fence of the Donjon, Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) Signpost of "Ni-no-maru" (m; the Intermediate Outworks of the Castle), Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Ni-no-maru" (m; the Intermediate Outworks of the Castle), Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Ni-no-maru no Ishi-gaki" (mۂ̐Ί_; the Stone Fence of the Intermediate Outworks), Kunohe-jo Remains
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(Wednesday 3 October) The cliff beneath the Hon-maru (the Donjon), Kunohe-jo Remains
  
     
Fukuan-kosha
     Fukuan-kosha Shrine/Temple (u), known as Naritasan Gokoku-den Shrine (cR썑a), Fukuoka, Ninohe City (ˎs).  It was founded on the site of the Matsu-no-maru of Kunohe-jo Castle (ˏ鏼m) after Shigenao Nambu (암 d), a grand son of Nobunao Nambu (see above) moved to Morioka1633 in (10th year of Kan-ei; i10N).  This is a branch shrine of Narita-san Shinsho-ji Temple, Narita City, Chiba.
  It enshrines Fudo-son (s; Skt. Acala; the God of Fire) from Narita-san, Narita City as the main image.  It also enshrines the Hachiman (), the Japanese God of War and the Kompira (䗅; Skt. Kumbhira; the guardian deity of seafarers; the Japanese Neptune) from the Shikoku Island.  The innermost shrine (̉@) on the top of the hill enshrines Dainichi-nyorai (@; Skt. Mahavairocanasatathagata; Dainichi Buddha, middle) with Yakushi-nyorai (Skt. Bhechadjaguru; the Physician of Souls, left) and Saigoku-Sanjyusan-Kanzeon (O\Oϐ; the 33 Goddesses of Mercy [Skt. Avalokitesvara] of the Western Japan Pilgrimage, right).
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(Wednesday 3 October) Entrance to Fukuan-kosha Shrine
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(Wednesday 3 October) The commemorative monument of the 2600th year of "Koki (cI; the Japanese Era which began in 660 BC when Jimmu-tenno (_Vc), the first emperor ascended the throne), Fukuan-kosha Shrine
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(Wednesday 3 October) Stone steps to the Ryugu-mon Gate ({; lit. "the Gate of the Dragon [Sea God]'s Palace), Fukuan-kosha Shrine
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(Wednesday 3 October) Ryugu-mon Gate ({), Fukuan-kosha Shrine
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Hai-den" (qa; Worshippers' Gate), Fukuan-kosha Shrine
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Hai-den" (Worshippers' Gate), Fukuan-kosha Shrine
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Hon-den" ({a; Main Hall), Fukuan-kosha Shrine
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(Wednesday 3 October) Stone image of Fudo-son (s; Skt. Acala; the God of Fire) from Narita-san, Fukuan-kosha Shrine
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(Wednesday 3 October) The innermost shrine (̉@) on the top of the hill (the Matsu-no-maru of Kunohe-jo Castle) enshrines Dainichi-nyorai (@; Skt. Mahavairocanasatathagata; Dainichi Buddha, middle) with Yakushi-nyorai (Skt. Bhechadjaguru; the Physician of Souls, left) and Saigoku-Sanjyusan-Kanzeon (O\Oϐ; the 33 Goddesses of Mercy [Skt. Avalokitesvara] of the Western Japan Pilgrimage, right).  Fukuan-kosha Shrine
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Chukon-hi" (), a monument to the loyal dead [war dead] on the hill (the Matsu-no-maru of Kunohe-jo Castle) behind Fukuan-kosha Shrine
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(Wednesday 3 October) Statue of Sontoku [Takanori] Ninomiya ({ also known as his childhood name Kinjiro [Y]), Fukuan-kosha Shrine.  Sontoku Ninomiya (1787-1856) was an agronomist and philosopher and government administrator.  He is known as a peasant sage or the national icon of diligence.  Especially in the early twentieth century, many local schools and libraries all over Japan erected the statues of the young Kinjiro Ninomiya ({ Y) for encouraging people to study and work hard.  See "Kyoto Pref. Library" of the Kyoto East page.
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(Wednesday 3 October) Statue of Sontoku [Takanori] Ninomiya (also known as his childhood name Kinjiro),Fukuan-kosha Shrine.  Sontoku Ninomiya (1787-1856) was an agronomist and philosopher and government administrator.  He is known as a peasant sage or the national icon of diligence.  Especially in the early twentieth century, many local schools and libraries all over Japan erected the statues of the young Kinjiro Ninomiya for encouraging people to study and work hard.  See "Kyoto Pref. Library" of the Kyoto East page.
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(Wednesday 3 October) The site of the Matsu-no-maru of Kunohe-jo Castle (ˏ鏼m) on the hill behind Fukuan-kosha Shrine/Temple (u), known as Naritasan Gokoku-den Shrine
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(Wednesday 3 October) The site of the Matsu-no-maru of Kunohe-jo Castle on the hill behind Fukuan-kosha Shrine/Temple, known as Naritasan Gokoku-den Shrine
  
     
Tendai-ji Temple
     Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple (tR V䎛), 33-1 Oyama-Kubo, Joboji-cho, Ninohe City (ˎsRv33-1) was reportedly founded by Gyoki (s, AD 668-749) in 728 (5th year of Jinki; _T5N).  He carved a statue of Sho-Kannon (ω; Sacred Kuan Yin; Skt. Avalokitesvara; now private) from the huge tree of Katsura (j; the Japan Judas-tree) near the entrance to the temple.  Since then, people have been sincerely worshipped the holy wooden image called "Keisen-bosatsu" (jF).  In the Heian Period (794-1185) the temple greatly prospered as the northernmost center of Buddhism.  According to the oldest surviving record, the temple was first referred to on the copper gong (k) in 1363 (18th year of Shohei; 18N).  However, the temple gradually declined without any powerful lord's sufficient support.  In 1658 (1st year of Manji; N) Shigenao Nambu (암 d) restored the temple and Shigenobu Nambu (암 dM) made through the large repairs on the temple buildings in 1690 (3rd year of Genroku; \3N).  The main hall called "Kannon-do" (ω) is the only surviving building because the Meiji Government promoted what is called "Haibutsu-kishaku" (pʎ; the anti-Buddhist movement in the early Meiji Era; the radical denunciation movement mainly done by Shintoists): Many historical halls and nearly 200 Buddhist images were destroyed and lost at that time.  The temple almost declined again and finally lost even the head priest in 1951 (26th year of Showa).
  The restoration restarted with the 71st head priest Toko Kon ( ) in 1976 (51st year of Showa).  It is doubtlessly Jakucho Setouchi (˓ ⒮) who most contributed to the restoration since she became the 73rd head priest in 1987 (62nd year of Showa).  Setouchi, widely known as a celebrated novelist, entered the priesthood under Toko Kon, Chuson-ji Temple (), Hiraizumi Town () in 1973.  She regularly presented many Buddhist sermons with her unique approachable words which attracted increasing visitors.  Thus Tendai-ji Temple became a most attractive Buddhist temple of Northern Japan.  Even after she retired from the temple in June 2005, she regularly visits this temple to give a monthly sermon for visitors (from May to November).  The current (74th) head priest is Chojyun Kanno ( , p.2005-present).
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Katsura Shimizu" (j; the Spring Water of Katsura) near the entrance to Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Katsura Shimizu" (the Spring Water of Katsura) near the entrance to Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Benzai-ten-do" (ٍV; Hall of the Goddess of Fortune [Skt. Sarasvati] of "Katsura Shimizu," Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Entrance to Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Approach to Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Approach to Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) A scenic view from the approach to Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Approach to Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Approach to Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) A small statue of Jizo (Skt. Ksitigarbha-bodhisattva; a guardian deity of children) along the approach to Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple.  There are uncountable small statues of Jizo in this temple.
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Nio-mon" (m; Gate of the two Deva Kings), Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Stone approach to Kannon-do (ω; Hall of Kuan Yin) or the main hall, Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Kannon-do (Hall of Kuan Yin) or the main hall constructed by Shigenobu Nambu in 1690, Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Kannon-do (Hall of Kuan Yin) or the main hall constructed by Shigenobu Nambu in 1690, Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Kannon-do (Hall of Kuan Yin) or the main hall constructed by Shigenobu Nambu in 1690, Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Kannon-do (Hall of Kuan Yin) or the main hall constructed by Shigenobu Nambu in 1690, Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Kannon-do (Hall of Kuan Yin) or the main hall constructed by Shigenobu Nambu in 1690, Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Kannon-do (Hall of Kuan Yin) or the main hall constructed by Shigenobu Nambu in 1690, Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) A huge votive tablet of a horse (Gn; 380 cm x 164.5 cm), Kannon-do, Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Many small statue of Jizo (Skt. Ksitigarbha-bodhisattva; a guardian deity of children) on the side of the Kannon-do Hall, Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Stone statue of Kannon (Kuan Yin; Skt. Avalokitesvara) Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) A small statue of Jizo (Skt. Ksitigarbha-bodhisattva; a guardian deity of children) near the Kannon-do Hall, Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple.  There are uncountable small statues of Jizo in this temple and each statue has a different expression on his/her face.
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(Wednesday 3 October) A small statue of Jizo (Skt. Ksitigarbha-bodhisattva; a guardian deity of children) near the Kannon-do Hall, Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple.  There are uncountable small statues of Jizo in this temple and each statue has a different expression on his/her face.
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(Wednesday 3 October) The belfry (O), Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple.  A hall called "Shaka-do" (߉ޓ) stood here before the Meiji Restoration in 1868.
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(Wednesday 3 October) "Goma-do" (얀; Hall of Homa; a holy fire for invocation; the Buddhist rite of burning cedar sticks on the altar), Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) A replica of "Uba-sugi" (W; lit. the old woman's Japanese cedar), Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple.  There were about 1,200 cedars with over-2-meter in diameter in the precincts.  This was the thickest with 5-meter in diameter and 15-meter in girth.  It was, however, burnt down in 1903 (36th year of Meiji) because of fire.  The municipal sightseeing office restored the tree follwing the historical record and the detailed survey in 2001 (13th year of Heisei).
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(Wednesday 3 October) A replica of "Uba-sugi" (lit. the old woman's Japanese cedar), Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) A replica of "Uba-sugi" (lit. the old woman's Japanese cedar), Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) A replica of "Uba-sugi" (lit. the old woman's Japanese cedar), Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) A signpost of the reported grave of Chokei-tenno (cVc ; 98th Emperor Chokei [Yutanari] or 3rd Emperor of the Southern Dynasty [쒩], 1343-1394; r.1368-1383), Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple.  His "authorized" grave was called "Saga-To-ryo" (㓌) in Kyoto, although there are some 20 other reported graves of the emperor over Japan (Aomori [X], Kawakami Village, Nara [ޗnj㑺], Ota City, Gunma [Qncs], etc.).  It proves that the retired emperor spent his remaining years full of vicissitudes, and that people all over Japan had a great sympathy with his fate at that time.
  Emperor Chokei was born between Emperor Go-Murakami (㑺Vc `; 97th Emperor Go-Murakami [Noriyoshi/Norinaga] or 2nd Emperor of the Southern Dynasty, 1328-1368; r.1339-1368) and Katsuko Fujiwara ( q; also known as Kakimon-in [Ê@]) as their first prince.  Emperor Chokei acceded to the throne at the Tsumori family (Î玁)'s mansion (now Sumiyoshi, Osaka [Zg]).  Tsumori was the head priest of Sumiyoshi-taisha Shrine (Zg).  At that time, the Southern Dynasty became weakened.  He was hostile to the Muromachi [Ashikaga] Shogunate and did not negotiate with the Northern Dynasty (k) during his reign.  He abdicated from the crown in favor of his brother Go-Kameyama-tenno (TRVc ꤐ: 99th Emperor Go-Kameyama [Yoshinari] or 4th [last] Emperor of the Southern Dynasty) in October 1383.
  The new emperor restarted to negotiate with the Shogunate and the Northern Dynasty.  Finally he completed the negotiation with the 3rd Ashikaga Shogun Yoshimitsu Ashikaga (3㑫R `) and went back to Kyoto on October 5th, 1392 and abdicated from the throne in favor of Go-Komatsu-tenno (㏬Vc m; 100th Emperor Go-Komatsu [Motohito], 1377-1433; r.1392-1412) of the Northern Dynasty and also presented him "San-shu no Jingi" (O̐_; the Three Sacred Treasures of the Imperial House or the three divine symbols of the Japanese Imperial throne).  Thus the two dynasties finally unified on November 19th, 1392 after the disintegration of 57 years (1336-1392).
  Chokei-tenno displayed a talent for literature.  He left numerous poems and Sengen-sho (w匹x1381), a dictionary (c. 1,000 entries) for The Tale of Genji (wx?1000).  Probably it was 73rd priest Jyakucho Setouchi (˓⒮) who made great efforts to restore the Emperor's reported grave because she also loves The Tale of Genji and completed her version of the tale into Modern Japanese in 1998 (20 vols.).
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(Wednesday 3 October) Steps to the reported grave of Chokei-tenno (98th Emperor Chokei [Yutanari], Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Steps to the reported grave of Chokei-tenno (98th Emperor Chokei [Yutanari], Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) The reported grave of Chokei-tenno (98th Emperor Chokei [Yutanari], Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) The reported grave of Chokei-tenno (98th Emperor Chokei [Yutanari], Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple.  The inscription board (without the date) on the left notes the biggest donor Kozo Minami with the name of 73th priest Jyakucho Setouchi.
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(Wednesday 3 October) The reported grave of Chokei-tenno (98th Emperor Chokei [Yutanari], Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Red Gate () to Gassan-jinjya Shrine (R_) in the precincts of Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple.  It is a branch shrine of Gassan-jinjya Shrine (R_), one of "Dewa-San-zan-jinjya" Shrines (oHOR_; The Three Sacred Mountains [Shrines] of Dewa), Haguro Town, Tsurioka City, Yamagata (R`߉sH).
  This branch shrine has served as the guardian shrine of Tendai-ji Temple for centuries.  The old hall, constructed in 1910s (Early Taisho Era; 吳Nԏ) was broken down 70 years after the construction because of the decay.  It was not until May 1992 (4th year of Heisei) that the hall was reconstructed with the supports of the local people under the consultantship of Jyakucho Setouchi and others.
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(Wednesday 3 October) Approach to Gassan-jinjya Shrine in the precincts of Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Gassan-jinjya Shrine in the precincts of Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Gassan-jinjya Shrine in the precincts of Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Gassan-jinjya Shrine in the precincts of Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Gassan-jinjya Shrine in the precincts of Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple
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(Wednesday 3 October) Gassan-jinjya Shrine in the precincts of Hachiyo-zan Tendai-ji Temple



        


Copyright (c) 2007 Eishiro Ito.  All rights reserved.